FUNNY ANIMALS AND MORE
October 20, 2013 posted by Fred Patten

Magical Little Girls

magical_girl

The first Japanese animation was theatrical, and meant for all audiences. The first TV animation was for adults (Otogi Manga Calender, 1962) and men and boys (Astro Boy, Hermit Village, 1963).

The first anime intended for girls was Sally the Witch in December 1966. This was almost immediately followed by Princess Knight in April 1967. The two established two of the three main forms of anime for girls; the magical little witch genre, and the shojo-heroine genre.

Two famous examples of the shojo-heroine genre are The Rose of Versailles and Revolutionary Girl Utena; and two more of the just-plain shojo are Candy Candy and His and Her Circumstances. However, there have been enough magical little witch series to fill this column alone. Their original formula was that a young girl from a magic dimension would come to Earth and use her magic to appear to be a normal 8- to 12-year-old girl. She would use her magic secretly. Although she was a preadolescent, she would have adventures without any adult supervisor. When using her magic, there would be a “transformation scene” involving a magical phrase and some form of magic wand, often disguised as a locket, which would be one of the series’ main merchandising tie-ins. The girl would usually have one or two magical animal companions.

As time went on, this formula developed many variants. The average girl grew older, from about 9 or 10 to about 14 or 15. Sometimes the girl was a normal human who controlled a magic object, but had to use it while avoiding being discovered by her parents or other adults. The most recent variant is the school for young witches in the magical world, where all of the classmates have magical powers.

Sally the Witch. Maho Tsugai Sally. 109 episodes, December 5, 1966 to December 30, 1968. Sally, the young Princess of Astoria, the Witch World, longs to visit the Human World. When she does transport herself there (an unnamed but obvious Tokyo), she meets two elementary school girls, Sumire-chan and Yo-chan, and uses her magic to become friends with them. When they are captured by two comic-relief burglars, Sally and Cub, another magical inhabitant from Astoria disguised as her little brother, play magical tricks to defeat them. Sally has such a good time that she decides to stay on Earth. She uses her magic to become Sally Yumeno, the daughter of a Tokyo family. The program was adopted from the manga by Mitsuteru Yokoyama, the creator of Gigantor; he acknowledged the American TV program Bewitched as his inspiration. The program was also memorable for its theme song by Asei Kobayashi, in the style of Dixieland jazz. A sequel, Sally the Witch 2, in which an older Sally returns to Japan to look up her old friends and have new adventures, ran for 88 episodes from October 9, 1989 to September 23, 1991.



Himitsu no Akko-chan. Akko-chan’s Secret. 94 episodes, January 6, 1969 to October 26, 1970. Atsuko “Akko-chan” Kagami is an elementary-school girl who likes mirrors. For her devotion to them, the Queen of the Mirror Kingdom gives her a magic mirror and a spell that allows her to transform herself into whatever she wishes to be. This was the first “magical little witch” series to feature a magical wand/object. This was also remade into two TV series, 61 episodes from January 9, 1988 to December 24, 1989 and 44 episodes from April 5, 1998 to February 28, 1989; two animated TV specials or OAVs; and a live-action feature.



cutie-honey225Cutey Honey. 25 episodes, October 13, 1973 to March 30, 1974. Go Nagai’s parody of the magical witch formula, for lusty adolescent boys. See my column “The Many Programs of Go Nagai”.

Majokko Tickle. Tickle the Girl Witch. 45 episodes, March 6, 1978 to January 29, 1979. Go Nagai’s serious contribution to the magical little witch genre. See my column “The Many Programs of Go Nagai”.

Lun Lun, the Flower Child. Hana no Ko Lun Lun. 50 episodes, February 9, 1979 to February 8, 1980. See my column “Anime Fandom in North America, part 2”.


Magical Princess Minky Momo. Maho no Princess Minky Momo. 63 episodes, March 18, 1982 to May 26, 1983. Fenarinarsa, “the land of dreams in the sky” where fairy-tale characters live, is in danger of disappearing because too many humans have lost their ability to dream and hope for a better future. The king and queen of Fenarinarsa send their daughter, Minky Momo, to help humans regain their dreams. She becomes the daughter of a childless couple, and goes about helping people regain their sense of wonder while accompanied by Sindbook the dog, Mocha the monkey, and Pipil the bird. There were numerous parallels with the Japanese folktake hero Momotaro, who was accompanied by animal companions. There were three OAV sequels in the 1980s and a new TV series with a new background story and supporting characters, 65 episodes from October 2, 1991 to December 23, 1992.

Magical Princess Minky Momo was the first magical little witch program to feature a teenager instead of a preadolescent; and to feature her transforming into idealized adult women’s occupations: a nurse, an airline stewardess, a policewoman, a soccer team manager, a saleswoman, a veterinarian, an explorer, etc.



Creamy Mami, the Magical Angel. Maho no Tenshi Creamy Mami. 52 episodes, July 1, 1983 to June 29, 1984. 10-year-old Yuu Morisawa is picked up by the spaceship of Pino Pino, a friendly alien. As thanks for Yuu’s helping him, Pino Pino gives her a magic wand for one year which can turn her temporarily into a 16-year-old; and two alien talking cats, Posi and Nega, to be her guardians. Yuu, as the 16-year-old Creamy Mami, becomes a super-popular rock singer, managed by Parthenon Productions. Creamy Mami was the first magical little witch TV anime to emphasize the problems of balancing a 10-year-old schoolgirl’s life with the career of a mega-popular teen rock star, and to show the dark reality of the pop-star music industry.



Magical Emi, the Magic Star. Maho no Suta Magical Emi. 38 episodes, June 7, 1985 to February 28, 1986. Mai Kazuki wants to become a master stage magician, like her mother who came from the famous Magic Carat Troupe. When Mai is frustrated by her juvenile inability to master complex adult stage illusions, the mirror fairy Topo gives her a magic bracelet that turns her into Magical Emi, a gifted teenage stage magician. Despite her success, Mai wants to learn to become a master stage magician without magical help.



Sailor Moon. Bishojo Senshi Sailor Moon; Sailor Soldier Team Sailor Moon. 46 episodes, March 7, 1992 to February 27, 1993; followed immediately by Sailor Moon R, 43 episodes from March 6, 1993 to March 12, 1994; followed immediately by Sailor Moon S, 38 episodes from March 19, 1994 to February 25, 1995; followed immediately by Sailor Moon SuperS, 39 episodes from March 4, 1995 to March 2, 1996; followed immediately by Sailor Stars, 34 episodes from March 9, 1996 to February 8, 1997. This was the first series to combine the magical little witch formula with the boy’s superhero team formula, with strong influences of the live-action “super sentai” costumed-hero teams. 14-year-old Usagi Tsukino, a typical boy-crazy teenager, meets Luna, a talking cat who tells her that she is the reincarnation of Sailor Moon, a magical warrior who saved Earth from various supervillains in the past. She must find the reincarnations of her teammates, and they must all battle the reincarnated villains while searching for the Moon Princess. The original team consists of Sailor Moon and Sailors Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, and Venus. Later additions are Sailors Uranus, Neptune, Pluto, and Saturn, and Usagi’s daughter Chibiusa from the future. Each series features a different team of villains; the Dark Kingdom, the Black Moon Clan, the Death Busters, the Dead Moon Circus, and Shadow Galactica. Sailor Moon was fantastically popular with young adolescent girls, generating three animated theatrical features, 25 stage musicals, a live-action 49-episode TV series, and numerous video games. In America, it was Sailor Moon that brought girls into anime fandom.



Cardcaptor Sakura. 70 episodes, April 7, 1998 to March 21, 2000. 10-year-old Sakura Kinamoto accidentally releases a magical deck of Tarot-like “Clow Cards” which escape separately around the city. Cerberus, the magical guardian of the book that they were imprisoned in, takes the form of a cute lionlike plush doll and tells Sakura that it is her duty to recapture them. Cardcaptor Sakura was notable for giving Sakura lots of human help from people who are aware of her identity, from her best friend Tomoyo who films her battles with the Clow Cards and makes superheroine costumes for her (which Sakura will not wear), to her teacher and her older brother.

Cardcaptor Sakura was famous in Japan as the first magical little witch series developed by CLAMP, the popular team of all-woman manga authors and artists. The manga by CLAMP and the TV series by Studio Madhouse got very good reviews. By 2000, Americans were well aware of the Japanese origins of dramatic animated TV series, and when the licensed American version, Cardcaptors, turned out to be heavily and haphazardly edited, there were strident demands from American fans for the original Japanese program.



Tokyo Mew Mew. 52 episodes, April 6, 2002 to March 29, 2003. 12-year-old Ichigo Momomiya attends an exhibit on endangered species with her boyfriend (she hopes) Masaya Aoyama. Shortly after leaving, Ichigo and four other girls are bathed in a strange light. The next day, she develops a cat’s ears and tail, and superhuman abilities. She learns from two handsome teenagers, Ryo Shirogane and Keiichiro Akasaka, that she has been infused with the DNA of the almost-extinct Iriomote cat (less than 100 left) to become Mew Ichigo and fight chimera animals. These are Earth animals that have been deliberately infected with an alien virus and have become monsters, to aid in the conquest of Earth by the human descendants of Earth’s former civilization who fled when Earth became too polluted, and have returned to reclaim the planet. Ichigo is assigned to find the other four girls from the exhibit who are to become her teammates: Mint Aizawa (Mew Mint), infused with a Blue Lorikeet’s DNA; Zakuro Fujiwara (gray wolf); Lettuce Midorikawa (finless porpoise); and Pudding Fong (golden lion tamarin). (Ichigo is the Japanese for Strawberry, and Zakuro for Pomegranate. All the girls have names of components of fancy desserts.)

Complications are that Ichigo has trouble persuading the other girls to accept her leadership; that, while the other girls were at the exhibit because of a genuine interest in endangered animals, she was only there to accompany Masaya; and that Kish, the most sympathetic of the aliens, falls in love with her. Ryo and Keiichiro help the girls establish a cover identity and secret headquarters as Café Mew Mew, an exclusive tea shoppe where they pose as waitresses.



Magical Witch Punie-chan. 8 OAVs of 12 minutes each, March 3, 2006 to October 21, 2008. It had to happen: a super-violent NSFW burlesque of the magical little witch genre. This could not be shown on TV. Punie Tanaka is the princess of Magical Land who, to succeed to the throne, must become a transfer student to a Japanese high school for a year. Not only are the teachers sadistic and the students mostly juvenile delinquents, she has many rivals from Magical Land who want to eliminate her as the heir. One is Paya-tan, the little dog(?) with a unicorn’s horn who is Punie’s cute animal companion to her face and who tries to assassinate her behind her back. Punie appears to be a sweet young girl until she gets into a fight – many of which she starts; then she unleashes her martial-arts and her magic with extreme graphic prejudice.



There are lots of other magical little witch TV series that I could list, such as Maho no Mako-chan/Magical Miss Mako, Fushigi na Melmo/Marvelous Melmo, Maho Tsukai Chappy/Chappy the Magician, Miracle Shojo Limit-chan/Limit-chan the Miracle Girl, Majokko Meg-chan/Meg-chan the Witch Girl, and Maho Shojo Lalabelle/Lalabelle the Magic Girl. And that’s just through 1980! Here is a fan’s montage of their opening credits.

However, here are two recent (about ten years old now) variants of the formula:

Sugar, a Little Snow Fairy. Chitchana Yukitsukai Sugar. 24 episodes, October 2, 2001 to March 26, 2002. Saga Bergman is a very orderly 11-year-old girl in a picturesque small German village. One day she finds a miniature little girl who is starving, whom she gives a waffle. The doll-like girl is Sugar, a 9-year-old apprentice season fairy who makes snow in winter. She has two friends; Salt, who makes sunshine, and Pepper, who makes breezes and windstorms. The three fairies are horrified to realize that Saga can see them, and make her promise not to tell any humans. The well-meaning but disorganized Sugar moves into Saga’s bedroom, creating a juvenile “odd couple” situation. Saga’s life becomes more complicated when more season-weather fairies show up in Muhlenberg, including three adults. Sugar is a stereotype of the well-meaning friend who cannot be dissuaded from “helping out” magically, with disastrous results that Saga must hide from her human friends and adults. Since many of the magical accidents are caused by Sugar trying to help Saga, this is a form of magical little witches.

Alice’s Magic Witch Squad. Maho Shojo Tai Alice. 40 episodes, April 9, 2004 to March 25, 2005. 11-year-old tomboyish Alice is bored with the world and thinks how nice it would be to be a witch. She is transported to a world where everyone BUT her is a witch. She is imprisoned after being mistaken for a renegade witch schoolgirl. When she finally convinces the authorities that she is a magicless human, she is enrolled in an elementary school for apprentice witches and assigned apprentices Eva and Shiela to teach her magic. The rebellious Alice gets them all into trouble. A witty reversal of the formula.



The first where three ordinary children get magic powers was Magical DoReMi/Ojamajo DoReMi (DoReMi, the Useless Witch); 51 episodes from February 7, 1999 to January 31, 2000. This was less interesting than Alice in my opinion (the children are 8 years old), but as the first, Ojamajo DoReMi was followed by TV sequels, theatrical featurettes, and OAVs.

To close, here is Little Witch Academia, one of the most recent; so recent that new Japanese Studio TRIGGER has only produced one episode and, in July-August 2013, raised enough funding through the American Kickstarter program ($625,518 of a $150,000 goal) to produce its second episode. This presents the whole first episode, untranslated; the first third of the first episode, with English subtitles; and the Kickstarter promo.


22 Comments

  • Fred, remember when we were in France in 1992 for the Angouleme comics convention? And I had seen an episode of some magical girl show one morning on the hotel room TV before leaving for the con? And I asked you what show it might have been? And there were so blinking MANY of the magical girl shows that were all so much alike that no matter how much I described what I had seen, we still couldn’t pin it down?
    I’ve seen the first season (of two) of CREAMY MAMI in a French DVD set. I didn’t get any sense of a “dark reality” of the pop star biz. It treats the business reasonably realistically, but it’s not dark. One slight concession to the real-world consequences of a ten-year-old girl having a second life as an older pop-star is a scene in which her parents spank her for coming home late. The one issue that isn’t dealt with is that her magical older self doesn’t have a legal identity, so how is Parthenon Productions paying her? There are scenes in which she is shown to have no money, so apparently they aren’t even though she’s a major success. The very similar later series FANCY LALA addressed the problem with the nine (!) year old heroine having her father set up a bank account into which the studio paid her 15-year-old self by making direct deposits without knowing who they were going to.
    Another witch school series that might be mentioned is SASAMI: MAGICAL GIRLS CLUB. It’s yet another outside the main canon spin-off of the TENCHI-MUYO franchise featuring the little girl character Sasami (previously depicted as a Sailor Moon-type magical girl called Pretty Sami in several mutually exclusive versions), here teamed up with several other girls who all have magical powers.

    • One obvious situation that “Creamy Mami” did not go into, nor would any of the other magical little witch series (except maybe Osamu Tezuka’s “Miraculous Melmo” — he was legally a physician, don’t forget), is that there is a physical difference between ten-year-old and sixteen-year-old girls. A ten-year-old girl that suddenly becomes sixteen years old is faced immediately with a lot of hormones that she doesn’t have the time to gradually grow into.

    • “One obvious situation that “Creamy Mami” did not go into, nor would any of the other magical little witch series (except maybe Osamu Tezuka’s “Miraculous Melmo” — he was legally a physician, don’t forget), is that there is a physical difference between ten-year-old and sixteen-year-old girls. A ten-year-old girl that suddenly becomes sixteen years old is faced immediately with a lot of hormones that she doesn’t have the time to gradually grow into.”

      Lord knows how easier it was to accept that than to creep out a few who didn’t expect to get into that territory to begin with.

      Of course I’m reminded myself of one of the many “anime’s craziest deaths” that occurred in the last episode of Minky Momo all the fans know by heart.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tBdSirpcVk

      The best the US ever got of Minky Momo was a dub of one of the OVA’s I recall (La Ronde in my Dream) though re-edited and titled by Harmony Gold as ‘The Magical Princess Gigi” (they used the “Gigi” name in some markets like Europe when the series was distributed there).
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztoAYNoYDiU

  • A nice article, though I was surprised by a few things: I’m a little disappointed that you included “bootleg” youtube videos for a couple titles, like Little Witch Academia when you can watch it free and legally on Crunchyroll: http://www.crunchyroll.com/little-witch-academia As well as Creamy Mami, which you can watch free and legally on AnimeSols: http://animesols.com/series/5

    Also disappointed not to see Akazukin Chacha on this list, or Sugar Sugar Rune, since those are both actual “witch” characters.

    And while you weren’t wrong about Dai Mahou Touge/Magical Witch Punie-chan, there were plenty of “adult”/fanservicey magical girl series/spoofs before it. There was “Moldiver” in 1993, and 1994′s “Venus 5″ comes to mind, as it was basically a hentai Sailor Moon-style story. We also have 1997′s Mahou Tsukai Tai!/Magic User’s Club , which was a more fanservicey OAV (and then TV series sequal) about a whole club full of witches (and even 2 male witches!) and even 2003′s “Papillion Rose”, another adult/spoof series that had SO many references to Sailor Moon.

    I could go on but anything else would probably just be me nitpicking…sorry if I sound that way, I just love the magical girl genre, so I felt like I had to throw some of that out there. I’m always glad to see articles promoting the history of the genre, though, in hopes people might take the time to learn there’s more out there than just Sailor Moon.

    • I included the programs that were on YouTube that I could easily link onto. I am unsure about either the ability or the legality of trying to link video samples from Crunchyroll and similar sites onto my columns to show you.

    • I included the programs that were on YouTube that I could easily link onto. I am unsure about either the ability or the legality of trying to link video samples from Crunchyroll and similar sites onto my columns to show you.

      That’s OK Fred, I’m sure the viewers will dig that up themselves since we managed to bring it up in these comments. See what else is out there besides Madoka Magica.

  • It’s a nice listing of the genre’s “greatest hits”, and it’s probably inevitable that some entries got slighted. What I’ve seen of “Ojamajo DoReMi” deserved a deeper look, both at the interaction of the various witches in training and their dealings with adults and classmates. Then there’s “Full Moon-wo Sagashite”, which, like “DoReMi”, “Minky Momo” and others, mixes the Magical Girl with the Idol Singer, but throws cancer into the mix. I would go so far as to include Vampire as a class of Magical Girl, which would open the door to “Rosario to Vampire”, “Karin (a/k/a Chibi Vampire)” and “Negima”, in which many of Negi’s students at Mahora Academy (that name is a giveaway) are Magical Girls of one kind or another. And what about “Kiki’s Delivery Service”?

    • Jerry has asked for weekly columns of about 1,000 words. According to my computer’s automatic counter, “Magical Little Girls” is over 2,500. I do not want to get into writing whole books, which it would take to cover all of the magical little witch series.

    • “And what about “Kiki’s Delivery Service”?

      While true that she’s a witch, I wouldn’t call her a “magical girl” personally since she doesn’t go too far besides flying in the film (not to say that real spells aren’t cast by witches in this world we only see a small part of). The story itself is more coming-of-age to me in how she learns to cope with the outside world and her abilities as a witch-in-training. There’s no real villain or any kind of antagonistic faction present in her life nor does it follow the usual trappings present if these Magical Girl shows (though I wouldn’t be surprised if there’s been doujinshi made that does so).

  • As a very casual observer of Japanese anime, I only have the most obvious of questions. Why do the characters all look similar, even though it might be different studios, different characters, and decades apart? And why is that similarity not Japanese? Few of the characters look Asian/Oriental. Was this intentional? Were they hoping for export right off the bat in the 60s? The characters all seem to have wide open eyes. Was this a wish fantasy of Japanese culture, or their attempt to appeal to a western audience?

    • Everybody asks that. One of my first questions, back about 1977 and specifically regarding series created by Leiji Matsumoto which all seemed to have a willowy blonde with waist-length golden hair but with a Japanese name, was why does anime have so many presumably Japanese characters that don’t look Japanese at all? And as Matsumoto always answered straight-faced, “Oh, she looks perfectly Japanese to us.” Osamu Tezuka said openly that he based his cartooning art style from the beginning on the Fleischers’ big-eyed “Betty Boop” cartoons, which were very popular in Japan in the 1930s until the militarists made it unpopular to admire anything from Western pop culture. The “big eyes” were the result of everyone copying Osamu Tezuka, later rationalized to the “big eyes are the windows of the soul” theory — they supposedly made it easier to show feminine emotions. At the time of the 1960s and 1970s, I don’t think that anyone in the Japanese animation industry really believed that there was a realistic chance of achieving international sales, so all anime was made for the domestic market, with an international sale as nice after-the-fact gravy if it could be made.

    • Fred lays it on…
      “Everybody asks that. One of my first questions, back about 1977 and specifically regarding series created by Leiji Matsumoto which all seemed to have a willowy blonde with waist-length golden hair but with a Japanese name, was why does anime have so many presumably Japanese characters that don’t look Japanese at all? And as Matsumoto always answered straight-faced, “Oh, she looks perfectly Japanese to us.”

      No arguments there (it’s like trying to question how ‘realistic’ eyes should be in any cartoon (which CGI has started perfecting whether we like it or not).

      “Osamu Tezuka said openly that he based his cartooning art style from the beginning on the Fleischers’ big-eyed “Betty Boop” cartoons, which were very popular in Japan in the 1930s until the militarists made it unpopular to admire anything from Western pop culture. The “big eyes” were the result of everyone copying Osamu Tezuka, later rationalized to the “big eyes are the windows of the soul” theory — they supposedly made it easier to show feminine emotions. At the time of the 1960s and 1970s, I don’t think that anyone in the Japanese animation industry really believed that there was a realistic chance of achieving international sales, so all anime was made for the domestic market, with an international sale as nice after-the-fact gravy if it could be made.”

      Some did make it over in the ensuing years, mostly to Europe where France and Italy saw no end to magical girls while America had to take the back seat. Though I already linked it on an earlier post someplace, Sally The Witch saw a French dub in Quebec under the name “Minifée” sometime in the 70′s. If anything, the near-westernized look of the characters probably made it convenient to import these classics despite what new names or changes were made to said series to remove that Japanese identity that was there.

  • I am a little surprised you never mentioned Precure in the article. It is arguably the most successful magical girl series of all time. It has been running for almost a decade and consistently takes the spot as the 2nd most profitable franchise for Toei Animation only being beaten by the juggernaut that is One Piece.

    http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2011-11-05/bandai-namco-breaks-down-revenues-by-franchise

    http://www.animeherald.com/2013/07/31/toei-posts-record-quarterly-profits/

    Unlike Sailor Moon it has yet to have any major American penetration outside of some hardcore US otaku but you would not ignore a series like Ashita no Joe, Captain Tsubasa, or Aim for the Ace for the same reason.

    • “Unlike Sailor Moon it has yet to have any major American penetration outside of some hardcore US otaku but you would not ignore a series like Ashita no Joe, Captain Tsubasa, or Aim for the Ace for the same reason.”

      Lord knows we should not forget those in our history books. Defining shows that should not be overlooked if one had to see what made anime what it is.

  • “Akko-chan’s Secret” was created by Fujio Akatsuka, who is primarily known for doing crazy, nonsensical gag manga. His other best known works are “Osomatsu Kun” and “Bakabon the Idiot Genius” (both of which I wrote about before on this site)

  • Holy cow! I thought Bullwinkle had all kinds of intros. Sailor Moon had even more than the moose. Just saying out of curiosity…..ok?

    • “Holy cow! I thought Bullwinkle had all kinds of intros. Sailor Moon had even more than the moose. Just saying out of curiosity…..ok?

      This is not uncommon Justin, it’s very common and has been around for about 30 years now. Fred brings it up in his article on Urusei Yatsura if you need to learn more about it. Basically the ploy of record companies in how to garner more bucks (or yen) from the fans who listen to these openings over and over and would love a copy on 45 or LP if they must.
      http://cartoonresearch.com/index.php/the-teenagers-from-outer-space-genre/

    • In the case of Sailor Moon, it was due mainly to the way the entire story was broken up into separate TV series of sorts. The first was called “Bishojo Senshi Sailor Moon”, and subsequent programs were listed with additional letters/words like R, S, SuperS and Sailor Stars. The first four series used the same opening theme song (“Moonlight Densetsu”) though Sailor Stars had it’s own for it’s opening. They all had different endings respectively.

      Outside the magical girl stuff (and one more familiar to us), Dragon Ball itself had separate series names and OP/ED theme songs that ran during it’s 11 years on TV (Dragon Ball, Dragon Ball Z and Dragon Ball GT).

  • I was wondering when we would get to the Sailor Senshis in this section. Is it true that a new series in under development?

    • That’s what I’ve heard as well, but then I’m sure the anime community have a thousand stories like that throwing around.

  • Regarding Sailor Moon’s popularity: Yes, it was hugely popular among its teen girls target audience. But it was also unexpectedly popular with adult males as well. Sailor Moon has a huge fandom of both demographics.

    As to the new series: http://www.themarysue.com/sailor-moon-stream-worldwide/

    • Regarding Sailor Moon’s popularity: Yes, it was hugely popular among its teen girls target audience. But it was also unexpectedly popular with adult males as well. Sailor Moon has a huge fandom of both demographics.

      Don’t make me bring this up again!
      http://www.sebby.org/pictures/2002/acen/acen10.jpg

      As to the new series: http://www.themarysue.com/sailor-moon-stream-worldwide/

      I suppose I wanted to ignore it myself, and had been doing anyway, but it’s there and we’re all invited!

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