ANIMATION SPIN
November 10, 2015 posted by

Disney’s “A Goofy Movie” on Records

Celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Goof’s big screen epic with this look at two albums that bring out the “gawrsh” in so many of us.

Left: the 1995 CD cover - Right: the 2007 reissue.

Left: the 1995 CD cover – Right: the 2007 reissue.

Walt Disney Pictures Presents
A GOOFY MOVIE

An Original Walt Disney Records Soundtrack
Walt Disney Records 60682-7 (CD / 1995) Reissue: 5099950772629 (CD / 2007)
Available for Download on iTunes

Executive Producer: Harold Kleiner. Score Producer: Carter Burwell. Additional Score Producer: Don Davis. Associate Score Producer: Bambi Moé. Orchestrator/Conductors: Shirley Walker, Don Davis. Additional Orchestrations: Lolita Ritmanis, Bruce Fowler. Vocal Contractor: Bobbi Page. Score Contractor: Reggie Wilson. Editors: Adam Smalley, Tom Carlson. Songs Recorded at Sunset Sound, The Bakery Studios, Ocean Way Recording, O’Henry Sound Studios, Paisley Park, Signet Sound Studios. Score Recorded at Todd-AO Scoring, Sony Pictures Studios. Running Time: 31 minutes.

Singing Voices: Bill Farmer (Goofy); Aaron Lohr (Max); Tevin Campbell (Powerline); Kevin Quinn (Lester); Wayne Allwine (Mickey Mouse). Studio Singers: Nathan Carlson, Gary Falcone, Scott Harlan, Linda Harmon, Nick Jameson, Rick Logan, Susan McBride, Bobbi Page, Carmen Twillie, Danice Axelson, Scottie Haskell, Reece Holland, Luana Jackman, Bob Joyce, Megan McGuire, Jonathan Redford, Chas Reisser, Josh Weiner, Jimmie Wood, Randy Crenshaw, Michael Lanning, Julia Waters Tillman, Luther Waters, Oren Waters, Maxine Waters-Willard.
Songs: “I 2 I”, “Stand Out” by Patrick DeRemer, Roy Freeland; “After Today”, “The Open Road”, “Nobody Else But You” by Tom Snow, Jack Feldman; “Lester’s Possum Park” by Randy Peterson, Kevin Quinn.
Score: “Opening Fanfare”, “Max’s Dream”, “Deep Sludge”, “Bigfoot”, “Hi Dad Soup”, “Runaway Car”, “Junction”, “The Waterfall”, “The Truth” by Carter Burwell, Don Davis.

Anyone who has an adolescent in his or her life knows how mortally embarrassed they can be at all times, especially by adults. The premise of this outstanding, moderately budgeted theatrical feature suggests the hellish concept that this embarrassing adult is your dad—and he’s The Goof himself.

That premise might serve well for a short subject or half-hour episode (and the film was an offshoot of the “Goof Troop” TV series), but it takes more to flesh it out to a full-length feature with no sign of padding. Under the freshman direction of Kevin Lima (“Enchanted”, “Tarzan”) and with a script by Jymn Magon, Chris Matheson and Brian Pimenthal, “A Goofy Movie” did it successfully, during an era in which several more lavishly mounted animated features were falling short of expectations.

Our editor snapped this photo of "The Goofy Movie" when it opened in Times Square in April 1995.

Our editor, Jerry Beck, snapped this photo of “The Goofy Movie” when it opened in Times Square in April 1995.

This was the first animated feature in which a classic “fab five” Disney character carried the lead role from beginning to end. “There was a lot of trepidation as to whether Goofy could handle a full length film but I think we definitely proved that he could,” said voice artist Bill Farmer. While some critics didn’t gel with The Goof, the film got a “thumbs up” from Siskel and Ebert, five Annie Award nominations (including Best Animated Feature) and was successful enough to warrant a sequel.

goofy-movie-posterA Goofy Movie is not a musical, but it features two elaborate musical sequences, two pop songs, a nice duet between Goofy and Max, and a loony song spoofing roadside attractions. Speaking of spoofery, the film is peppered with wry but gentle satirical barbs, many of which go by so fast they require repeated viewings.

That’s particularly true of the two big signature production numbers. Rich in gags, each is akin to similar set pieces in Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast”, released four years earlier. “After Today” is like “Belle” as it opens the film and establishes lots of archetypal characters in a short period of time. The “Be Our Guest” equivalent is “On The Open Road” in which every driver and passenger on the highway—even Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse—gets a few minutes of screen time.

“The songs were actually recorded before anything else,” Bill Farmer recalled. “Aaron Lohr, who sang for Max, was a wonderful kid, and a good singer, so I was a little intimidated. Luckily Goofy doesn’t have to be a great singer, so they chose the right guy for that. We did both songs in a couple of hours. I went home and thought, did I just sing two songs that are going to be in a movie? It didn’t feel like it!”

The only thing that was never quite made clear was the reason Jason Marsden, who voices Max in the feature, was not asked to sing Max’s songs. “Later on, I found out that he can sing, and we were always a little upset that he didn’t get that chance,” said Bill. “But recently, when they celebrated the 20th Anniversary of ‘A Goofy Movie’ at the D23 Expo in Anaheim we were able to sing the song live and show the world that Jason definitely can sing, and sing well.”

“It was packed!” said Bill of the event. “It was like being The Beatles. We got a standing ovation. We had Tevin Campbell singing ‘I 2 I”, which he hadn’t sung in 20 years. We got a three-minute standing ovation after the show–and I was proud to find that we were the only panel among the ones at D23 that got a 100% from the attendees. We beat out the Star Wars panel and they had George Lucas and Harrison Ford!

“I feel very vindicated about how much people love this movie. It’s very heartwarming.

GIVE A LITTLE LISTEN
“On the Open Road”
The “Be Our Guest”-like show stopper from “A Goofy Movie”, features Goofy, Max and appearances by Mickey Mouse, Donald Duck, musical cowgirls, a honky tonk pianist, truck driver, a convict, a cat lady, honeymooners, firemen, police, a mafia hit victim, a corpse, tourists, flying acrobats and a quartet of singing nuns.


Disney12DaysChristmasCD

THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS
Walt Disney Records 60617-2 (Stereo / CD)

Released in 1991. Executive Producer: Harold Kleiner. Producer: Robin Frederick. Vocal Arrangements: Bill Elliott Running Time: 38 minutes.

Voices: Wayne Allwine (Mickey Mouse); Russi Taylor (Minnie Mouse, Huey, Dewey, Louie); Bill Farmer (Goofy); Alan Young (Uncle Scrooge McDuck). Studio Singers: Mary Hylan, Angie Jarée, John Laird, Gary Jones, Aleta Braxton, Jess Harnell, Clydene Jackson Edward, Myrna Matthews, Raymond MacLeod. Recorded at Kingsound Studios, Score One Recording, Paramount Recording Studios. Art Direction: James DiMauro, Vince Peterson. Illustration: Jeff Schroeder, Greg Wray.

Songs: “Sleigh Ride Through the Snow” by Andy DiTaranto and Samuel J. Wisner; “Christmas Together” by Phil Baron; “Twelve Days of Christmas”, “O Christmas Tree” (Traditional, Lyrics by Robin Frederick); “A Gift of Love”, “Dear Santa” by Michael and Patty Silversher; “Snow Ho Ho Ho” by Robin Frederick; “Santa Claus is Comin’ to Town” by J. Fred Coots, Haven Gillespie; “Downtown Holiday Hullabaloo” by Roy Zimmerman, Melanie Harby; “I’d Like to Have an Elephant for Christmas” by Hank Thompson; “He Delivers” by Sandy Sherman; “Around the World Christmas” by Dave Kinnoin, Jimmy Hammer; “Here We Come A-Caroling”, “We Wish You a Merry Christmas” (Traditional).

When I’ve asked Bill Farmer, Russi Taylor and Wayne Allwine to choose a Disney recording as their favorite, they each answered, without hesitation, The Twelve Days of Christmas. There are many fine Disney holiday recordings, but this one is extra special.

“We sang it together,” recalled Bill Farmer. So many character voices–be they for film, Theme Parks or records—are recorded separately. But this album came along during a particularly fertile period for Disney music and records, when circumstances allowed for a simple yet richly produced album–one that had no tie in with any larger initiative, except that it starred the core Disney stars. This unpretentious status afforded it freedom from the spotlight and the assortment of hands that help cook the broth when all eyes are on a project.

goofy_waving_christmas_ornamentThe esprit de corps was in high gear and it is audible from beginning to end. The album blends traditional songs with brand-new compositions, plus a few from previous Disney recording projects (like “Dear Santa,” a tune from a read-along; and “The Gift of Love”, a magnificent song originally written for Buena Vista’s “Rainbow Brite” album).

It also offers one of the cornerstone qualities that make a great children’s album: it’s eclectic. The songs don’t all sound alike; there are carols, dance and play-along tunes, big band music and rich choral pieces, all done in with an exuberance that never loses its robust energy.

Bill Farmer has a ball with Goofy’s solo, “I’d Like to Have an Elephant for Christmas”, a novelty number that may have marked the first time he employed Goofy’s warbling tremolo (something that even Pinto Colvig did not do). “That was one of the first times, or very early on when I started using it. It kind of developed and it seemed to catch on, to add a little bit of humor. It’s a staple now. We use it quite a bit.

“Making this album was just one of those rare times when everyone was into it, and had a great time with each other. It was more like play than work.”

GIVE A LITTLE LISTEN
“A Gift of Love”
Patty and Michael Silversher, who have written a library of great Disney songs, from the theme to “Disney’s Adventures of the Gummi Bears” to “Happy Happy Birthday to You”, wrote this for the aforementioned LP, “Rainbow Brite Christmas”. This is the remake for “The Twelve Days of Christmas”, with Mickey and the gang—even Uncle Scrooge–experiencing the joy of giving generously to others.

This is the original Rainbow Brite version:

14 Comments

  • Amazing how we seen Max as a teenager and how he changed through out the years from a Ginger/Red hair toddler that looked nothing like Goofy (AKA George Geef) in the 1950’s (and he had no name to my knowledge) then fast forward to the Goof Troop era where Max as he is now known as a grade schooler with Pete’s son Pete Jr as his best friend and how Max “lost” his Ginger/Red hair and started to look like Goofy during the George Geef era (Max was voice by Nancy Cartwright who also did the voices of Bart Simpson, Nelson Muntz and Ralph Wiggum in The Simpsons and Spoiled Brat Princess Lu in Mike,Lu and Og ) and How Max now in High School looking like George Geef and how they brought back the classic Goofy in The Goofy Movie and its sequel The Extremely Goofy Movie.

    • Amazing how we seen Max as a teenager and how he changed through out the years from a Ginger/Red hair toddler that looked nothing like Goofy (AKA George Geef) in the 1950′s (and he had no name to my knowledge)

      He was simply called “Junior” in those cartoons. Not much of a name but there you go

      then fast forward to the Goof Troop era where Max as he is now known as a grade schooler with Pete’s son Pete Jr as his best friend and how Max “lost” his Ginger/Red hair and started to look like Goofy during the George Geef era (Max was voice by Nancy Cartwright who also did the voices of Bart Simpson, Nelson Muntz and Ralph Wiggum in The Simpsons and Spoiled Brat Princess Lu in Mike,Lu and Og ) and How Max now in High School looking like George Geef and how they brought back the classic Goofy in The Goofy Movie and its sequel The Extremely Goofy Movie.

      Call it a bit of a good call they redesigned Goofy’s son the way they did back in the 90’s from where he had started I guess. Aside from the two Goofy movies, there was also Max’s appearance in “The House of Mouse” (as a valet parking attendant, possibly in his early 20’s) and as well in a segment of “Mickey’s Once Upon A Christmas” (now as a little kid again, slightly younger than he appeared in Goof Troop).

    • Actually, on Goof Troop, Max was voiced by the late Dana Hill. Nancy Cartwright voiced P.J.’s little sister Pistol Pete.

  • The only thing that was never quite made clear was the reason Jason Marsden, who voices Max in the feature, was not asked to sing Max’s songs. “Later on, I found out that he can sing, and we were always a little upset that he didn’t get that chance,” said Bill.

    I suppose that’s one of those mysteries we’ll never know the truth to (at the time for me, it was why wasn’t Pauly Shore credited for his role of Bobby in the film, but I’m sure I know the answer to that now). Either it was a legal/studio reason or nobody asked Jason if he could do it at all then. Certainly a missed opportunity. Someone on that YouTube clip suggested if the films a BluRay release of sorts, they ought to go and get Jason to do a new recording of those song and made that an extra for the release of sorts, at least correct that mistake.

    What I will say is A Goofy Movie became something of a classic to those of the Y-Generation who watched it over and over (thanks to home video) and memorized every scene and song by heart, and to this day, there’s plenty of tribute/homages to certain songs from the film on YouTube such as these…
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fchAMqkh1o
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mC8qrZ7HQpU
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYhvAIEGI_Y
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lo0jAiFow5M
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JSPt7b7CpbA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CzMn-oGeK8U
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=icaq-Hc3KmE
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mctAjnLz_n0

    I never realized how any “After Today” videos could be created by I suppose that was a rather easy one to get all your friends together on.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OABeWNqZph4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwQN0q2pe0A
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QruzMqGc7Co
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3IydP2zXb0
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZdMD_QNTFss
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ajkqrs1qMRU

    For a moderately budgeted film, they created a very unique, wonderful experience that stood the test of time (so far). At the time it came out, I didn’t think much of it, though I wished I had saw it on the big screen (I was in my junior year of high school and going through that “cartoons are dumb” stage and didn’t think the film was for me anyway), looking back at it, it’s definitely aged well.

  • 11/11/15
    RobGems.ca Wrote:
    I remember seeing “A Goofy Movie” at The Oxford Twin Cinema in Oxford Michigan when it first premiered back in 1995. I was a huge fan of the “Goof Troop” series on both ABC TV (Channel 7-WXYZ Detroit) and in syndication as part of “The Disney Afternoon” program (on Channel 20-WXON-UHF Detroit) While I was pleased with the movie and was glad to see familiar faces (Goofy,Max, PJ, Pete) and some of the new ones (Stacy, Bobby Zimmerinski, Powerline, and especially the very ravishing Roxanne), I was disappointed by some of the changes made from the TV series (no appearances of Pistol, Waffles The Cat, Chainsaw The Dog, and especially one of the best characters of “Goof Troop”, Peg “The Pegster” Pete. She’s still a popular favorite among fans in Deviant Art.) The music was great, so I went out and bought the cassette version of The “Goofy Movie” soundtrack. I still have it today in reasonably good condition. “Out On The Open Road” and “Eye 2Eye” still remain favorite songs after 20 years. the “Extremely Goofy Movie” of a few years later was okay, but not as good as the first Goofy movie. This time the producers and writers had to remove Roxanne, and I didn’t like it one bit. I did like new characters Sylvia Marpole and The unnamed “Beret Girl”, but that was all that second movie had to offer. i do remember that the second movie had great visuals during the Disco flashback scene of Goofy’s and Sylvia’s, but somehow the “extreme sports” theme of the main movie has not dated too well with me it’s so 1998, and in 2015, the “Jackass” inspired death-defying sports attempted by teenagers has somewhat dated badly. I don’t remember a soundtrack album of “An Extremely Goofy Movie”, so can you clue me in on this mystery? Thanks.

    • Nice one came out at all. The “extreme sports” bit in the film was basically what ESPN and it’s sister channel were doing at the time, namely the “X Games” competition that was big at the time (not to mention the film plugs the network too).

      Aside from it’s differences, the sequel does provide me with one moment liked of Goofy being so melancolic after having to see his son leave him for good as he walked into Max’s bedroom to finds he left his teddy bear after all.

  • No mention of the Goofy Movie picture disc that just came out?

    http://imgur.com/WrE8jzC

    • Wow! Thanks for letting us know! Gonna buy one right away!

    • Nice to see it got an LP release.

  • Chris, according to Bill Farmer, the reason Pauly Shore wasn’t credited in the first movie was because Shore didn’t *want* to be credited. He was embarrassed to be doing a voice in a Disney film, and didn’t want people to know it was him.

    By the time he had done the sequel, he apparently had a change of heart.

    • Perhaps by then, he had received some positive feedback for his role in the first film and wished he wasn’t that embarrased over voicing a cartoon that had left an indelible impression on it’s viewers. I suppose Shore oughtt to been lucky Bobby was still used in the sequel given the larger exposure of him and PJ at Max’s college.

  • 11/14/15
    RobGems.ca Wrote:
    Thanks for your information about “X-Games” on ESPN, Chris. I almost forgot about that program. I generally remember The “Jackass” movies because they received all kinds of negative publicity about their dangerous stunts that injured a number of people;the stunts were that stupid. The stunts performed on “An Extremely Goofy Movie” weren’t that over-the-top in stupidity, but many teenagers with skateboards imitated the stunts, nonetheless. I don’t dislike the second movie, mind you, I just think that the subject matter is a bit dated from a 2015 perspective, although, kids today still do daring attempts with skateboards and other accessories (bicycles, motor-bikes,etc.) A recent character that appears on Disney’s recent TV series “Star Vs. The Forces Of Evil” concerns the skateboard-riding antics of Jackie Lynne Thomas, who rides her skateboard all over the school walls and halls and the school yards (and somehow doesn’t get caught by the teachers or the principal!) It’s similar to what Max and Goofy did in their second movie, only a sports entertainment network wasn’t behind the scenes. The only other thing I dislike about both “Goofy” movies are the absence of Roxanne in the second movie and the absence of Peg Pete in both movies (“Goofy” fans like to point out that Pete & Peg got a divorce behind the scenes of the movies by the time of the first movie, but still…..) Also thanks, Greg for your information of the soundtrack music from the second “Goofy” movie. I simply don’t recall seeing the soundtrack back in 2000 for this movie like I did for the soundtrack of the first movie in 1995. Speaking of saying how dated the extreme sports subject matter are for the second movie, today’s kids who see this movie would state that the antics of Max and Goofy’s may not be forgotten too far back in time, but the Disco dance scenes of Goofy and Sylvia’s may be considered ancient to audiences today. (So 1977 in 2015.) Of course I remember when I was a pre-teen when Disco music came out at the time, so I got the gist very easily.

  • Nothing about the Tevin Campbell songs for the film and their associations with the Prince/Paisley Park consortium?

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