Category Archives: Christopher P. Lehman

Huck and Jim (Crow)
Christopher P. Lehman
February 11, 2017 posted by Christopher P. Lehman

Huck and Jim (Crow)

To be sure, television was a democratizing force in animation. It allowed African Americans to see cartoons in their homes, in contrast to being restricted to balcony seats at theaters.

Those MGM Jazz Frog Cartoons
Christopher P. Lehman
January 14, 2017 posted by Christopher P. Lehman

Those MGM Jazz Frog Cartoons

Beyond producing cartoons starring humanoid versions of Bosko and Honey at MGM, Harman and Ising also specialized in films starring caricatures of black jazz musicians – as frogs.

“Klanimation”
Christopher P. Lehman
December 3, 2016 posted by Christopher P. Lehman

“Klanimation”

Commercial animation during the silent era rarely addressed political movements – and staffers of the cartoon studios comprised part of the demographics that the Ku Klux Klan abhorred.

Quincy Magoo Meets Jim Crow
Christopher P. Lehman
November 5, 2016 posted by Christopher P. Lehman

Quincy Magoo Meets Jim Crow

Steve Bosustow traveled to New Orleans to promote the premiere of UPA’s 1001 Arabian Knights. He spoke at Tulane University, which in 1959 had no African American students – ironic, considering UPA’s earlier work like Brotherhood of Man.

Cartoon Exhibition In The Segregated South
Christopher P. Lehman
July 16, 2016 posted by Christopher P. Lehman

Cartoon Exhibition In The Segregated South

Many theaters across the country, especially in the South, refused to admit African Americans. This month we take a look at how segregation shaped the cartoon-viewing experience in a typical southern city.

A Letter From Martha Sigall
Christopher P. Lehman
June 18, 2016 posted by Christopher P. Lehman

A Letter From Martha Sigall

With the Fourth of July upon us in a few weeks, I thought I would present correspondence about Any Bonds Today (1941) from the late, great, beloved Martha Sigall.