Category Archives: ANIMATION ANECDOTES

Animation Anecdotes #398
ANIMATION ANECDOTES
January 18, 2019 posted by Jim Korkis

Animation Anecdotes #398

In 1991, Michael Eisner announced that the VHS release of the Disney’s Fantasia would only be available for 50 days and then “permanently withdrawn from the market”.

Animation Anecdotes #397
ANIMATION ANECDOTES
January 11, 2019 posted by Jim Korkis

Animation Anecdotes #397

“With the Garbage Pail Kids – we had all the best intentions of being able to translate the cards into a program but it didn’t work. The fit just wasn’t right.”

Animation Anecdotes #396
ANIMATION ANECDOTES
January 4, 2019 posted by Jim Korkis

Animation Anecdotes #396

When Miles Laboratories released Flintstones Chewable Vitamins in 1968, there were Fred, Wilma, Barney, Bamm Bamm, Pebbles, Dino and Fred’s car but no Betty.

Animation Anecdotes #395
ANIMATION ANECDOTES
December 28, 2018 posted by Jim Korkis

Animation Anecdotes #395

“Cats Don’t Dance was supervised by no less than eight executives in its lifetime, several of whom would have rather ironed Chris Farley’s underwear than make an animated movie.”

Animation Anecdotes #394
ANIMATION ANECDOTES
December 21, 2018 posted by Jim Korkis

Animation Anecdotes #394

“You do not write down for animation. As a matter of fact, the music needs to be as emotionally powerful as it can be, because music is casting a spell.”

Animation Anecdotes #393
ANIMATION ANECDOTES
December 14, 2018 posted by Jim Korkis

Animation Anecdotes #393

The poster for The Great Mouse Detective was roughed out by the Disney publicity department and sent to the animation department.

Animation Anecdotes #392
ANIMATION ANECDOTES
December 7, 2018 posted by Jim Korkis

Animation Anecdotes #392

In 1986, producer and animator Phil Mendez had created his own little animation empire based on his creation of Kissyfur, spawning prime-time specials, a series and a ton of merchandise.

Animation Anecdotes #391
ANIMATION ANECDOTES
November 30, 2018 posted by Jim Korkis

Animation Anecdotes #391

Composer Richard Stone used the same soundstage that Carl Stalling recorded on for the classic Warner Bros. cartoons to make the music for Animaniacs.